Death by Agile Fever

In an enlightening and entertaining post, Alex Bell takes to task the Zeal that blinds many to the obvious shortcomings of Agile.

Bell categorizes the following Agile fevers:

  • Lemming Fever
  • Easy Button Fever
  • One Size Fits All Fever
  • Elbow Grease Fever
  • Hallelujah Fever
  • Parrot Fever
  • Cook the Books Fever

As well as several others.

He also coins the term “Fragilista” to denote an Agilista who is thin skinned and lacks the strength to control his or her emotions in response to a perceived attack on Agile.

Many of the ideas he brings up are strongly related to my post here.

Ultimately, Bell feels that these Fevers are caused by the arrogance, ignorance, and insular narcissistic attitudes of many in the Agile community.

He claims: “The antidote for the many forms of Agile Fever is education. Unfortunately, the infectees who are most desperately in need of such education are often unaware of what they don’t know about Agile, are unreceptive to learning about what they don’t know, or believe that those trying to educate them are simply village idiots who have not yet seen the brightly burning Agile light.”

What’s your take?
PostAgilist

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About postagilist

Architect, Manager, Developer, Musician, Post-Agile thought leader
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2 Responses to Death by Agile Fever

  1. Somewhere over the rainbow says:

    The term “Fragilista” came from the book “Antifragile”. Nevertheless, giving a good read, i.e the mentioned book, to an “Agile/scrum” folk only leads to an onerous exhibition of the confirmation bias.

    In fact, Scrum is the touristification of software development.

    • umlcowboy says:

      Yikes, I did not realize that I was a plagiarist. I truly believed that I had made up the term…oh well.

      I just looked up Antifragile and see that it is *not* a book about software development. So, perhaps my unintended plagiarism could be excused a little bit! Some out of context plagiarism, of sorts.

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